Scottish Burgh, Church and Academic Records

1317 Johannes de Tolidef was claiming his right to lands and possesions inherited from his mother.  The original record is in Latin, a translation follows.  Were the lands in question those of Raniston, which we know the family owned by the 15th century?

“Die sabati proximo ante festum sancti luce ewangeliste comparuit in tolloneo coram balliuis Johannes de Tolidef gener ade de Ran dicens quod ut intellexerat roginaldus de Ran filius ade de Ran predicti se recognouerat in dicto tolloneo breui tempore elapso ad quosdam redditus terras et possessiones in diuersis vicis et locis burgi de Aberdene jacentes et ipsum ratione alicie quondam matris sue sponse ade predicti jure hereditario contingentes ut dicebat in quibus idem roginaldus nullum jus habuit aut clamium sed ipse johannes.”   The Miscellany of The Spalding Club, Vol V, Page 13

On the Saturday next before the feast of Saint Luke the Evangelist there appeared before the bailiffs in the tolbooth [town hall or other public building] John de Tolidef, gentleman of Adam de Ran, Saying that as he had heard, Reginald de Ran, son of the aforesaid Adam de Ran, in the said tolbooth a short time past, had acknowledged himself [to be entitled] to certain rents, lands and possessions lying in various neighbourhoods and places of the burgh of Aberdeen, and concerning him by hereditary right, by reason of Alice, his late mother, spouse of the aforesaid Adam,  In which, as he said, the same Reginald had no right or claim, but only he, John [had such right].

1398   By the time of William (de Tulidef), the family of Tulliedaff held the property of Orchardtown in Fermartyn. This constituted only a part of the ancient barony of Tulliedaff, which had been owned by a family of the same name that had long since ceased to exist in the main line having no known male representative. There was no known building on Orchardtown.

William de Tulliedaff had been served heir to his father, John, in 1398, in the third lands of Ledyntuche and Rothmaise, in the shire of Rayne in the Garioch.   At this time he was clearly of age. William is recorded as being one of the Church vassals in Rayne.  Under such obligation he fought at the Battle of Harlaw.  The Parson of Rayne was a Lundie, also Archdeacon of Aberdeen and the famed “fighting chaplain” to Earl James of Douglas at the Battle of Otterburn. It seems unlikely that Lundie would pass up such a fight suggesting that William fought in the vanguard to the Earl of Mar’s Army at Harlaw.  William de Tulliedaff was killed at Harlaw. Studies suggest it is he that was likely buried on the hill of Rothmaise in “The black cairn”

Under the terms of a statute of General Council, in favour of those who fell at Harlaw, Andrew de Tulliedaff, son of the said William, though still under age, was, in 1413, served heir to his father and exempt from feudal payment. cf. “The Blackhalls of that Ilk”, Alexander Morison, MD., FRCP, L&E.

1444 August 14th  John of Twlydeff Admitted as a Burgess, probably of Guild, at the request of the Lord of Twlydeff, his father, who would have been a Burgess in his own right. Aberdeen Register of Burgesses for 1399 – 1630 Ref;IV., 356

1444 Lord of Twlydeff  was a Burgess of Aberdeen in his own right.  Extract from Aberdeen Council RegistersAberdeen Council Register: 7 August 1444, p356

IT IS TO REMEMBIRE YAT ON  YE (SEVENTH) DAY OF AUGUST YE YERE A (MCDXLIV)  YE QWILK DAY IT WES GRANTYT BE YE CONSALL AT YE REQUEST OF YE LORD OF TWLIDEFF BALLz YE FREDOM OF YE  GILD TIL jOHN OF TWLYDEFF {(SINE PC^TO EX^O V Ss)}  Aberdeen Register of Burgesses for 1399 – 1630 Ref;IV., 356

1450 Andrew Tulidef  “The first Tulliedaff to be named “of that ilk” was Andrew, who in 1450 gave a charter to Elizabeth Tulloch, spouse of Thomas Kennedy, Constable of Aberdeen. The next, probably his son, is Alexander of that ilk”  “The Thanage of Fermartyn” by Rev. William Temple    

1452/3 In the Council Register of Aberdeen Andrew is shown as being the cautioner for Gilbert Leiche who was admitted as a Burgess during those years. Andrew would have been a Burgess in his own right. Aberdeen Council Register V., 773-4

1457  Alexander Tulliedaff of that ilk is witness to a charter of 1457 given to Alan de Kynard. The other witness in this charter was Alexander Dumbreck of that ilk. He is also mentioned in various deeds of dates 1470, 1476, 1494, 1495, as recorded in the volumes of “The Antiquities of the Counties of Aberdeen and Banff” published by The Spalding Club. At the date 1490 his name occurs in a precept of sasine of Andrew Wod of Over-blairton. He and Andrew, his son and apparent heir, are both mentioned. By the latter he was succeeded before 1498. “The Thanage of Fermartyn” by Rev. William Temple

1475  September 28th  William de Tulidef Admitted as a Burgess, probably of a Guild, having married the daughter of Adam De Craufurd.  De Craufurd would have been a Burgess prior to that date.   Aberdeen Register of Burgesses for 1399 – 1630 Ref; VI., 393

1476 February 9th John de Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen being the son of the late Andrew Tulidef, Burgess Aberdeen Council Register VI., 399

1477 October 4th  – Henry de Tulidef was made Burgess of Aberdeen – he was a cordonar (cordwainer) Aberdeen Register of Burgesses for 1399 – 1630 Ref. VI. page 453

1496/97 Patrick Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen Aberdeen Council Register VII., 767

1497/98 Patrick Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen Aberdeen Council Register VII., 838

1497/98 David Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen Aberdeen Council Register VII., 838

1498  Andrew Tulliedaff of that ilk appears as a witness in 1498 to a sasine of Lord Glamys. In 1506 he is witness to a charter of Walter Hay, and is employed frequently on inquests down to 1511. In Pitcairns Criminal Trials we find that on October 31st, 1505, there is a remission to Andrew Tulliedaff of that ilk for oppression of him by William Turing of Foveran, destroying his ploughs and certain houses. He was succeeded by his son, Alexander Tulliedaff of that ilk.. “In 1528, July 12, Christina Tulliedaff is served heir to Andrew Tulliedaff of that ilk in the lands of Orchardtown, Tulliedaff, and the lands of Logieruiffe.” cf. The Thanage of Fermartyn – Rev. Wm. Temple

1507/1508 Alexander Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen, probably of a Guild, during the above years. Aberdeen Council Register VIII., 761  As Alexander Tulliedaff of that ilk in 1509 he appears as one of the jury on the inquest of Andrew Cruikshank. He is succeeded by a son or grandson Andrew Tulliedaff of that ilk cf. The Thanage of Fermartyn – Rev. Wm. Temple

1518 Andrew Tulydaff appears to have been defrauded of property or land by a number of people.  There is a record in the Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland of payment being received for a letter of rehabilitation.  A translation follows:

Et de xx ii., in partem solutionis nonaginta librarum compositionis litere reabilitationis concesse Andree Tulydaff de eodem, Alexandro Annand, Alexandro Pantoun, Willelmo King, Jacobo Caldour, Juwyn Gardyne, Thome Wod, Johanni Setoune, Johanni Gardyne et Henrico Owdny convictis pro voluntario errore per eosdem commisso; et sic restant lxx ii onerande ut supra.

And of 20 pounds, as partial payment of 90 pounds for the composition of the letter of rehabilitation granted to Andrew Tulydaff  of the same, Alexander Annand, Alexander Pantoun, William King, Jacob Caldour, Juwyn Gardyne, Thomas Wod, John Setoune, John Gardyne and Henry Owdny, convicted for the voluntary error committed by the same; and so there remain 70 pounds, to be burdened as above  Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland Vol V 1518 – 1531 page 143

1522 August 4th Alexander Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Trade on 4th August 1522, described as a Tanner Aberdeen Council Register XI., 3

1524 Andrew Tulideff appears from an entry in the Accounts of The Lord High Treasurer of Scotland to have made payment for the lands of Tulideff, as well as making payment as a marriage-portion.  A translation follows.

Et de lxxxvj ii. xiij s. iiij d., in completam solutionem compsitionis warde relevii nonintroitus terrarum de Tulideff cum pertinentibus, in manibus regis existentium per mortem quondam Andree Tulideff de eodem, concessarum Andree Tulideff filio ejus et suis assignatis.

And of 86 pounds, 13 shillings and 4 pence, for the complete payment for the composition of the ward, relief and non-entry of the lands of Tulideff along with their appurtenances, existing in the hands of the king, once granted through the death of Andrew Tulideff of that ilk to his son Andrew Tulideff and his assigns

Et de jcxlvj ii. xiij s. iiij d., in completam solutionem compositionis maritagii Andree Tulideff de eodem cum pertinentibus, in manibus regis existensis per mortem quondam Andree Tulideff sui avi, concessi Isobelle Masoun et suis assignatis.

And of 146 pounds, 13 shillings and 4 pence, for the complete payment for the composition of the marriage-portion of Andrew Tulideff of that ilk, along with its appurtenances, existing in the hands of the king, once granted through the death of Andrew Tulideff his grandfather to Isobelle Mason and his assigns. Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland Vol V 1518 – 1531 page 187

1525 April 1st Henry Tullidaff is mentioned in the Shetland Court Books in the British Library – doc. 46, Browe, 1 April 1525, discharge by Thomas Olasone to Henre Tulideff of Browe. Henre is said to be “ayr tyl the said Rychard [Lesk] and Margaret [of Ayth]”

and  doc. 150, Scalloway banks, 16 March 1565-6, “Excambion, Katheryne Tullidaff, daughter and one of the heirs of umquhil Henry Tullidaff, and Nycholl Hacrow, her spouse”

It is thought that Henry went to Orkney as a falconer in the service of the Earl of Orkney.  Falcons were collected as a form of tax and sent to Edinburgh for use in falconry.  He then married the daughter of Richard Leask in Shetland.  Scottish Exchequer Rolls Volume 14 pages 72 and 301-302

Hibbert, Description of the Shetland Islands, 1822, p. 243. “The story of the struggle between Dillidasse (note – misreading of Dillidaffe) and Sinclair of Sandwick, resulting from the slaying of Richard Leask, son-in-law of the same Oliver Sinclair of Brew, as he entered the Kirk of Dunrossness, is also unknown but for this MS. of Kay. The slaughter in revenge is stated to have taken place near Laxfirth in Tingwall. Not far distant in the same parish is a standing stone which has for long been regarded as the scene of the death of Malis Spere, on the occasion of his incursion in Shetland, as recorded in the Iceland Annals in 1329: but these events are involved in much obscurity. Richard Leask, son-in-law to Sinclair of Brew, who was stabbed, was probably a man of some consideration. Sir David Sinclair of Sumburgh, in his Will, dated 1506, appointed Richard Leask one of his executors, along with Thorrald of Bruch, who was probably the then laird of Brew. They are described as ‘discreit men’; and to Leask (‘Richart Lesk’) he leaves 20 merks land in Cwndistay (?) and his English ship — ‘my Inglis schipe with all geir.’ Assuming that Richard in both cases is the same individual, some clew is given to the date of the story, which may probably have been somewhat earlier than the reign of Queen Mary”. IX. — MINUTES OF COURT HELD AT SUMBURGH IN DUNROSSNESS, 1602.    The Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing, s.v., “Diary of the Reverend John Mill, Minister of the Parishes of Dunrossness Sandwick and Cunningsburg in Shetland, 1740-1803”  It is thought that at the time that Richard Leask was slain Henry was in Orkney, and he went to Caithness to gather some of his friends and then returned to Shetland to seek revenge. “Description of Ye Countrey of Zetland,” 1908

1526 October 1st Gilbert Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen having been servant to the Provost of Aberdeen, Thomas Menzies of Pitfodels Aberdeen Council Register XII., 40

1527  John Tillidaff was in St. Andrews, Fife, as Warden of the Greyfriars, and in 1527 was one of the members of a Council of Theologians (headed by Cardinal Beaton) which was set up to decide whether articles written by Patrick Hamilton constituted heresy.  Precursors of Knox: or, Memoires of Patrick Hamilton, Alexandre Alane, or Alesius, and Sir David Lindsay . collected from original Sources : Vol. 1. Patrick Hamilton, the first Preacher and Martyr of the Scottish Reformation by  Peter Lorimer   There is a second reference to this John, spelled Tullideph, in a list of former owners of books which are in the library bequeathed to St. Andrews University by William Guild, Principal of Kings College, Aberdeen, 1640 – 1651.   He is also mentioned in Durkan and Ross, p. 154 –  Tullideph, John. Franciscan, theologian at St Andrews in 1541, also warden. Perhaps also at Elgin and Aberdeen. (160)” Durkan and Ross wrote a book published in 1961 called Early Scottish Libraries.

1528 July 12th Christina Tulliedaff is served heir to Andrew Tulliedaff of that ilk in the lands of Orchardtown, Tulliedaff, and the lands of Logieruiffe. cf. The Thanage of Fermartyn -Rev. Wm. Temple (Note – this is a misprint or an error on the part of the author as there is an identical record in the Retours of Services of Heirs for July 12th 1558 – see below)

1529 – 1535 Andrew Tulidef was mentioned in relation to a charter: “This seal is attached to the charter granted by Alexander Auchneiff in favour of David Anderson, dated 19th March, 1529-30, and already referred to. The charge on this seal is a hind couchant between a star in chief and in base. In font’s MS. there are said to be two stars in chief and a crescent in base, while Stodart thinks that the animal in the centre resembles a rabbit rather than a hind couchant. The legend is— S. ANDREE Touledef. This family took its name from the barony of Tullydaff in Aberdeenshire, and mem-
bers of the family are met with in local records very frequently. Andrew Tullidaff was a baillie on five occasions during the decade 1529-1539, and his seal is attached to this charter in his official capacity”. “Scottish Notes and Queries Vol IV” published by D. Wylie and Son Aberdeen 1890-91

Was it the same Andrew who appeared to own several areas of land around Aberdeen?  In the book “Aberdeen Friars, Red, Black, White, and Grey” Andrew is mentioned in relation to a “precept of sasine, granting to the (Black) Friars Preachers an annual of 40s Scots from the sunny half of his lands at Little Warthill in the Parish of Rane” on 30th July 1532 (there spelled Tullidef).  In the same book the next item relates to a “Process in claim by Mr Andrew Tulidef, prelocutor, for the Prior, anent a croft in the Green occupied by George Bissat. on 12th August 1532, (also relating to the Black Friars).

In the Registrum de Aberbrothoc (The Register of Arbroath) Andrew appears to own land and property in the Torry area of Aberdeen.  – is it the same Andrew?  See below in 1535.

1530  Tillydaff Laird of Warthill was killed.   “Half a mile eastward of Drums Cairn is a small cairn in the Moor of Rayne called Tillydaffs Cairn, as marking the place where Tillydaff, Laird of Mains of Warthill, was killed in 1530.  Having assaulted a neighbouring landlord, Leslie of Warthill, second son of Wardhouse, in Lawrence Fair, he was pursued by Wardhouse and his other sons for several miles and fell by their hands at this spot.  Now a small green mound which does not appear to have been opened.” Ordnance Survey Name Books, Aberdeenshire OS Name Books, 1865-1871, Aberdeenshire volume 77 page 79

1530 October 3rd William Tulydef was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen, probably of a Guild Aberdeen Council Register XIII., 9

1530 October 7th John Tulydef was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen, probably of a Guild.   Aberdeen Council Register XIII., 9

1535 Andrew Dyllidaff In 1535 the Register of Arbroath describes an area of property using that of  Andrew as a direction:  Translated from the original Latin:  The abbey grants to Walter Anderson, his heirs and his assigns one rood of earth lying between the barony of Torry and the regality of Arbroath between the lands of Andrew Dyllidaff to the west and the Firth to the north on one side, and the Ferry Croft to the east and the croft belonging to the said town of Torry on the other, together with another tenement lying to the western side of the said lands of the said Andrew Dillidaff and the Firth to the north on one side, and the Ferry Croft to the east and the croft belonging to the said town of Torry on the other, together with another tenement lying to the western side of the said lands of the said Andrew Dilledaf, being 48 yards in length and 12 yards in breadth, together with two grass soums on the mountain and soil belonging to the said lands. By paying twelve shillings of Scottish money. 12 August 1535.

The original Latin text is given here:

Page 523 Registrum de Aberbrothoc  Paragraph 813: Abbas concedit Valtero Androson suis heredibus et assignatis vnam rudam terre iacentem insra baroniam de Torre et regalitatem de Abyrbroyth inter terras Andree Dyllidaff ad occidentem et le Fyrth ad  boream partibus ab vna et le Fery Croft ad orientem et croftam pertinentem predicte ville de Torre partibus ab altera – vnacum tenemento  altero iacente ad occidentalem partem predictarum terrarum dicti Andree  Dillidaff et le Fyrth ad boream partibus ab vna et ly Ferre Croft ad  orientem et croftam pertinentem predicte ville de Torre partibus ab altera vnacum tenemento altero iacente ad occidentalem partem predictarum terrarum dicti Andree Dilledaf habente in longitudine quadraginta octo vinas et in latitudine duodecim vinas vnacum duobus ly forcmys gyrfs in monte et glebis concernentibus predictis terris – Reddendo duodecim solidos moncte Scocie – 12 Augusti 1535

Note: Upper and Lower Torry: These settlements were part of a series of lands, stretching down to Cove on the east coast, which belonged to the Abbot of the Abbey of Arbroath from the 12th century until the reformation in 1560. Lower Torry seems to have been the larger of the two settlements. In 1495 the Abbot received a charter from James IV erecting Torry into a Burgh of Barony. This was to help develop services for travellers coming to Aberdeen. The subsequent building of the Bridge of Dee in the 1520s was probably instrumental in ensuring that Torry never developed as a Burgh of Barony. But the community continued to grow. In 1535 there is the name of Torry’s first pub, ‘le Sandy Velle’. The hamlets were composed of a number of different crofts. By the late 18th century Lower Torry had begun to develop into what we know as Old T. Aberdeen City Council leaflet Torry Urban Trail

Maybe the following reference refers to the same Andrew.  In the book “Aberdeen Friars, Red, Black, White, and Grey” Andrew is mentioned in relation to a “precept of sasine, granting to the (Black) Friars Preachers an annual of 40s Scots from the sunny half of his lands at Little Warthill in the Parish of Rane” on 30th July 1532 (there spelled Tullidef).

In the same book the next item relates to a “Process in claim by Mr Andrew Tulidef, prelocutor, for the Prior, anent a croft in the Green occupied by George Bissat. on 12th August 1532, (also relating to the Black Friars).

1540 (about) Oliver Tullideph was born to Robert Tullideph and a sister (name unknown) of George Wishart – date of birth is uncertain but we know that Oliver was old enough to have witnessed and remembered his uncle George Wishart being burned at the stake for heresy in 1546, yet in 1559 he was described as a youth.  A major incident in his life is well recorded and his story is told on this site. The Book of Perth by J. Parker Lawson

1541 – after 1639  Thomas Tullidaff as recorded in Fasti: , born 1541; reader at Logie-Buchan from 1574 to 1580 ; adm. to this charge in 1582; dem. in 1632. In a supplication to the General Assembly in 1639, when ninety-eight years of age, he stated that “having no better securitie for the soume of 400 merkes a-yeare, but the simple bond of his successor, who may be transportit, or sus-pendit, etc.,” therefore prayed that he might be secured in the said sum during his life, with which request the Assembly willingly complied. He marr. a daugh. of Stephen Mason, min. of Slains, and had issue Samuel, assistant at Slains, 1614-20, schoolmaster of Ellon in 1620 ; Alexander, assistant schoolmaster at Ellon in 1620 ; William. [Belhelvie Sess. Rec. ; Gordon s /Scots A, (fairs, iii. ; Aberdeen Sheriff-Court Records, ii., 238 ; Mair s Ellon, 107, 127 ; Rfc. Sec. Siy., 1621 ; Peterkin s Records, 260.]

1541  March 28th George Tulidef was admitted as a burgess of Aberdeen, probably of a Guild, being the son of a Burgess Aberdeen Council Register XVI., 350

1550 (about)  Marjory Tullidaff was born to Andrew Tullidaff of Tullidaff and Orchardton and married William Seton of Blair (15xx – 1612) Burgess of Aberdeen in 1595, and Superior of Licklyhead. She inherited the Tullidaff property together with her two sisters Jonet and Christina. The King and Queen grant charter to Cristina Tulydaff, and Mr. James Stevin in Thorn- toun her spouse, of the lands of Orchartoun, in the barony of Tulydaff, which Jonet Tulydaff, and William Knowis her husband, and Marjory and Cristina Tulydaff, portioners of said lands, with consent of William Seytoun of Easter Disblair, husband of said Marjory, resigned. Dated at Edinburgh, 20th September 1566. — Lib. xxxi. No. 529.

Charter by the King and Queen to Marjory Tulydaff, and William Seytoun of Wester Disblair her spouse, of the south part of the lands of Logyruff and others, resigned by the other persons named in preceding note. 20th September 1566. — Lib. xxxi. No. 530. A History of the Family of Seton During Eight Centuries by George Seton, Advocate MA. Oxon. etc. (Vol II Edinburgh, privately printed by T. and A. Constable, Printers to Her Majesty 1896)

Her son William Seton inherited the Tulliduff property from Marjory as well as the Seton property and title from his father (1612 – 1616).  Apr. 26th, 1623, he was noted as a Scottish Catholic active in 1629 with the Marquis of Huntly with other nobles of Aberdeenshire, and the Duke of Buckingham in England, in support of Catholicism and noted in the Domestic Annals of Scotland (Reign of King Charles I, part B). (This was in direct conflict with the Tullideph family in Fife who were staunch Presbyterians with Covenanters among them).

1547 22nd April John Tulidef was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen, probably of Guild, being the son of a Burgess. Aberdeen Council Register XIX., 218

1548 March 2nd Gilbert Tulidef was admitted as a Burgess of Aberdeen being the son of the late “Mr. Andrew Tulidef” who would have been a Burgess in his own right.  Aberdeen Council Register XIX., 396   13th August 1548 acted as cautioner for Jasper Bard on his admission as a Burgess, probably of a Guild Aberdeen Council Register XIX., 398

1549 11th October  Thomas Tulidef was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen Aberdeen Council Register XX., 289

 1555  September 30th Andrew Tullideff was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen being the son of the late Nicolas Tullideff who would have been a Burgess in his own right.  Aberdeen Council Register XXII., 155

1558 July 12th Christina Tullidaff, haeres Andreae Tullidaff de Eodem, patris, – in terris de Orchardtoun et Tullidaff;  – terris de Logie Ruf – A.E. 6m N.E. 24m  Retours of services of heirs, 1544-1699 Vol A Aberdeen

         Christina Tullidaff, daughter and heir of Andrew Tullidaff of that ilk inherited the lands of Orchardtoun and Tullidaff – land of Logie Ruf 

1569 8th April Andrew Tulidaff was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen being the son of Gilbert Tulidaff who would have been a Burgess in his own right.  Aberdeen Council Register XXVI., 638

1569 Gilbert Tulidaff was Burgess of Aberdeen in his own right (see Andrew his son above)  Aberdeen Council Register XXVI., 638

Sheddockley Estate:  In 1551, the estate of Sheddockley was feued to John Irvin and Gilbert Tullideff for £53 : 6 : 8. It was bought back again by the town in 1677 and refeued in 1702. In 1759, it was bought back still again and refeued. It got much subdivided in the process (Cruickshank and Gunn, 1929) but its main divisions became: Gillahill; Newpark (Cuttlehill); Whitemyres; and Maidencraig. (Sheddocksley is now a district on the outskirts of Aberdeen)

In 1556 there was a dispute over property occupied by Gilbert, recorded in the Burgh Court Book “Process in claim against Gilbert Tullidef for “ane litill twne stoip” belonging to the (Black)Friars (on May 5th 1556) Aberdeen Friars: Red, Black, White, Grey; preliminary calendar of illustrative documents –  Anderson, P. J. (Peter John), 1852-1926

1572 15th November Walter Tullidaff was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen, probably of Guild, being the son of the late John Tullidaff, elder.  Aberdeen Council Register XXVII., 767

1592 Andrew Tilliduff is listed in “Acts and Proceedings of the General Assemblies of the Kirk of Scotland 1560 – 1618” among “The names of these that suberived the Band anent the Religion, at Aberdeen, March 1592” and signing his name “Androw Tillidaffe of Raniestoune”.  Andrew was also mentioned in an account of a witches trial: Extracts from The Witches of Scotland by W. H. Davenport Adams published 1889:  …… a profound interest attaches to the official ‘dittay’ or accusation against one Helen Fraser, who was convicted and sentenced to death in April, 1597, since it shows that she was condemned principally upon the evidence which she herself supplied:  xvi Item–By witchcraft the said Helen abstracted and withdrew the love and affection of Andrew Tilliduff of Rainstoune, from his spouse Isabel Cheyne, to Margaret Neilson, and so mightily bewitched him, that he could never be reconciled with his wife, or remove his affection from the said harlot; and when the said Margaret was begotten with child, the said Helen conveyed her away to Cromar to obscure the fact.  Thomas Tullidaff (I don’t know the relationship between the two, but Thomas was a Minister of the Kirk) was involved in the conviction of Helen.

1593 November 12th Alexander Tulidaff was admitted as Burgess of Aberdeen.  His cautioner was Andrew Tullidaff.  Aberdeen Council Register XXXV., 95, 421

1595 Johne Tallydaff is mentioned in “Extracts from the records of the Aberdeen Burgh 1625-1642 (Pub. 1871)” on page 125 as being a ballie of Aberdeen on 14th February 1595, and again on 23rd March.

1608  Andreeas Tullidaff was admitted to the Marischal Collage and University of Aberdeen  Fasti Academiae Mariscallanae Aberdonensis.    An Androw Tillidaff was the father of James Tillidaff baptised in 1625 – (see Baptisms page) was it Andreeas?

1614 – 1620 Samuel Tullidaff, son of Thomas and Unknown Mason, was schoolmaster at Slains.  In 1620 he became schoolmaster at Ellon.  Fasti ecclesiæ scoticanæ – Synods of Aberdeen and Moray  In 1605 a Samuel Tullideff was admitted to The Marischal College and University of Aberdeen on 3rd October 1605 – was it this Samuel?  Fasti Academiae Mariscallanae Aberdonensis : selections from the records of the Marischal College and University, MDXCIII-MDCCCLX

1620 Alexander Tullidaff son of Thomas Tullidaff and (Unknown) Mason was schoolmaster at Ellon in Aberdeenshire Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae,the succession of ministers in the Church of Scotland from the reformation

1625 Arthur Tullidaff – An Arthurus Tullidaff was in the list of Alumni and Graduates in Arts of the Marischal College and University of Aberdeen in 1635. Fasti Academiae Mariscallanae Aberdonensis : selections from the records of the Marischal College and University, MDXCIII-MDCCCLX

1628 and 1634 – Johne Tullideffe received payment as the “reider and master of the musick school ” in Tayne.  Ancient Scotish Melodies: From a Manuscript of the Reign of King James VI by By William Dauney Esq. FSA Scot.

1629 – Stevin Tyllidaff was a professor of music at the “school of sang” in Dunfermeline at the time of his daughter Grissle’s birth (pages 156 and 157 of “The Burgh records of Dunfermline in 16th and 17th Centuries”) and by the time of the birth of Alisone he is in Edinburgh.  A reference to him as a professor of music in Edinburgh has been seen but can no longer be found.

1641 February 26th Elizabetha Tulliedaff, haeres Alexandri Tulliedaff de Mostoun, patris, – in villa et terris de Mostoun, infra parochiam de Logiebuchan et baroniam de Tulliedaff . – A. E. 20s.  N. E. 4l Retours of services of heirs, 1544-1699 Vol A Aberdeen

                Elizabetha Tulliedaff was the daughter of and heir to Alexander Tulliedaff of Mostoun in the town and land of Mostoun in the parish of Logiebuchan and barony of Tulliedaff. 

1665 April 5th Joannes Bannermane filius legitimus natu maximus quondam Joannis Bannermane in Pitullune, procreati inter eum et Elizabetham Tillidaffe ejus sponsam, haeres dictae Elizabethae, matris, – in terris de Mostoune, infra parochiam de Logiebuchan, et baroniam de Tillidaffe. – A. E. 20s. N. E. 4l  Retours of services of heirs, 1544-1699 Vol A Aberdeen

            Joannes Bannermane, legitimate eldest son of the late Joannis Bannermane in Pitillune, born to him and the late Elizabeth Tillidaffe was heir to the said Elizabeth, mother, of her lands of Mostoune in the parish of Logie Buchan and of the barony of Tillidaffe.  

1688 William Tullidelff M.A. Wemyss, formerly of Kilbirnie.  adm. in 1688; trans to St. Leonards, St. Andrews, in 1691  Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Synods of Fife, and ofAngus and Mearns page. 120

1691  –  Dunbarney John Tullideph, son of William T., Principal of St Leonard s College, St Andrews ; licen. by United Presb. of Kirkcaldy and Dunfermline 25th Oct. 1688; called in 1690; ord. 14th Jan. 1691; died 26th Aug. 1714. He marr. (1) 20th Feb. 1691, Jean, daugh. of John Knox, min. of North Leith : (2) 7th July 1694, Katherine Rankine, in the parish of Liberton, and had issue William ; Thomas, Principal of United College, St Andrews ; Walter ; David ; John ; Helen (marr., pro. 3rd July 1720, Alexander Trotter, min. of Edrom) ; Margaret. Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Synods of Argyll and of Perth and Stirling Page 204

Extracts from “The New Statistical Account of Scotland”, Vol. X, Perth, published by William Blackwood in 1845  Page 823;

Mr John Tullidaph or Tullideff, son of William Tullideff, Principal of St. Leonard’s College, St. Andrews, and who was supposed to have been one of the ministers ejected after the Restoration. He was ordained here (Dunbarny) on 14th of January 1691 and died 26th of August 1714* “after a long vacation of more than three years.”

Extract from Presbytery Register: “The Episcopal incumbent, (i.e.) Mr John Balneaves, having been very early deprived of his office, the lairds of Kilgraston and Dumbarny presented a call to the presbytery, August 9th 1690, in favour of Mr John Tullidaph, preacher of the Gospel, to be minister of Dumbarney. The presbytery finding several informalities in the call, and particularly that there was not yet a constituted session in that parish, first proceeded to ordain a qualified session here, and after this was done and all the necessary formalitirs observed, Mr John Tullidaph was ordained and admitted minister of Dumbarney, January 20th 1691. His son was the celebrated Mr Thomas Tullidaph, Principal of St. Andrews.”

1696 Margaret Tillidaff is recorded in the Poll Tax records as living at Maynes of Meickle Auchredie, Ellon, Aberdeenshire with a daughter, Elspet Keith. Tax payable was 12s. 

1727 Thomas Tullideph called 16th August and ord. 2nd November 1727; trans. to Markinch 7th Oct. 1731.   [Owing to disputed presentations the parish was vacant ten years.]  Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Synods of Argyll and of Perth and Stirling Page 203

1731 Thomas Tullideph trans. from Dron; called 28th April, and adm. 7th Oct 1731; dem. on appointment as Professor of Divinity, St. Mary’s College, St. Andrews, 17th Oct. 1734.  Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Synods of Fife, and of Angus and Mearns page 113

               1739 Thomas Tullideph trans from Professorship of Divinity in St. Mary’s College with Principalship [q.v.] in conjunction; called 16th Aug. and adm. 13th Sept. 1739. Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Synods of Fife, and of Angus and Mearns page 243